GRASS SEED

Grass seed stock is available for purchase year round! 

Prices range between

$4.00 - $22.00 per pound depending on type.

 

To purchase please stop by the office between

8:00 AM - 4:30 PM Monday - Friday

to fill out an order form and submit payment.

We accept cash and checks only.

Arriba Western Wheatgrass

Wheatgrass is a major range grass in the northern and central Great Plains, where it is used for pasture, hay, and erosion control. Western Wheatgrass develops slowly from seed, is drought resistant, and has moderate alkali tolerance. Recommended seeding rate for Western Wheatgrass is 9+ Lbs. to the acre. Arriba Western Wheatgrass has rapid germination and good seedling establishment. Dense, dark-green, medium-height foliage: aggressive rhizomes. Superior to other accessions tested in seed production.

Blue Grama

Blue Grama grass is a warm season tufted perennial grass. It is native to the short and tall grass prairies. Blue Grama can grow up to 18 inches tall. It grows as a bunch of grass, forming open sod mats. As it matures and is grazed on by animals, bunches grow together and form the thick sod. Blue Grama is an important prairie grass because it’s dense, shallow root mass holds down the soil and keeps it from blowing away. Blue Grama is 6-12 inches high. It has flat leaves that come to a point at the end. The leaves can grow from 1-10 inches long and 1/8 inch wide. The flower stems grow 7-18 inches tall. The flowers looks like crescent moons perched on the end of the flower stem. A flower consists of 20-90 little spikelets. Blue Grama flowers anytime between June and August, depending on what part of the prairie it’s growing in, and how much moisture it receives.

Buffalo Grass

Buffalo Grass is a warm season grass that becomes green in mid-to-late May and becomes dormant again around late September once night temperatures begin to freeze. Once established, it requires little supplemental water or fertilizer, is low-growing, and therefore needs little mowing.

Dryland Blend

A mixture of hardy, drought tolerant grasses adapted to the Northern Great Plains and Intermountain regions. It is widely adapted to many soil types and elevations of 3,000 - 10,000 feet. The mixture is ideal for areas not receiving regular irrigation. This is a cool season mix, with growth patterns up to 4 feet tall.

Jose Tall Wheatgrass

Tall Wheatgrass has been traditionally used only as a field grass: however, “Jose Select” has great value as an ornamental cultivar with its tall, stiffly upright habit and beautiful straw-yellow flower stalks. It is particularly valuable through the winter months as it is not flattened by heavy snow. Group “Jose Select” with mounding seeds like Stipa and Helictotrichon to contrast their shapes and textures. Tall Wheatgrass grows in any soil, including highly alkaline clays, and produces large seeds relished by game and songbirds. Generally grows 4-5 feet high and 18 inches wide.

Native Lawn Mix

Blue Grama is a very economical way to cover larger areas growing in tall bunches. Seeds can be sown beginning in late spring or early summer when the night temperatures reach 60°F and continue through the summer. Buffalo Grass is also a very economical way to cover large areas growing low and spreading, as well as is easy to maintain needing little mowing and little water or fertilizer once establishes. It greens up in mid-to-late May and becomes dormant again in late September once temperatures begin to freeze. As a mixture, the Blue Grama (tall bunches) and Buffalo Grass (low-spreading), mesh well together providing a good “lawn” cover of green grass.

Winter Rye

Annual Ryegrass is an erect, robust, cool-season bunch grass that reaches a height of 3-4 feet. Plants are yellowish-green at the base and have 12-inch long glossy leaves. This species has a heavy, extensive, fibrous root system. Annual Ryegrass has small seeds (approximately 190,000 seeds/lb.) that germinate rapidly. Seedlings quickly establish a ground cover and are very competitive. Annual Ryegrass flowers in late May to early June and matures seed by late June to early July.

Christmas Tree Permit Sales begin November 13, 2018

Albuquerque, NM – November 5, 2018 – Christmas tree cutting permits will go on sale at several Cibola National Forest and National Grasslands locations.

 

Trees may be cut in either the Magdalena Ranger District or Mt Taylor Ranger District between November 22 and December 24, 2018. The cost is $10 per tree for trees up to 10 feet. Trees taller than 10 feet will cost an additional $1.00 per foot. The permit may also be used to dig up a living tree. Conifer species such as Pinon and Juniper, Douglas Fir, Ponderosa Pine, Blue Spruce, Engelmann Spruce, and Sub-alpine Fir may be cut from designated areas only. A map of the designated areas will be provided with each permit.

 

Christmas tree permits may be purchased at the following location:

 

Cibola National Forest and National Grasslands Supervisor’s Office

2113 Osuna Road. NE; Albuquerque, NM. Phone: 505.346.3900. Hours: Weekdays 8:00 am to 11:00 am and 11:30 am to 4:00 pm; permits will be issued until December 24.

 

 

CIBOLA DRAFT PLAN & EIS

The Draft Plan and the Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Cibola National Forest Mountain Districts are available for preview on our plan revision website at the following link:

  http://www.fs.usda.gov/goto/CibolaFPR

This is a preview of draft documents. It is not a formal release of the draft documents nor a formal scoping period.

 

Upcoming Board Meetings

~~~~

November 8, 2018

10:00 AM

 

November 2018 Agenda
November 2018 Agenda.pdf
Adobe Acrobat document [73.8 KB]

Edgewood SWCD

2506 Route 66

Moriarty, New Mexico

(one mile west of Moriarty)

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